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In all parts of the world, food is an essential element to any celebration. The following foods are often found at a Moroccan celebratory feast.

 

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Chicken Bastilla. Often served at wedding or family celebrations, the dish is best described as a savory and sweet chicken, almond, and egg pie. Although individuals sometimes opt for an individual serving, this dish is usually presented as a large communal pie. Chicken Bastilla requires a lot of time to prepare, although steps aren't very complicated. 

Seafood Bastilla. It doesn't take a gourmet Moroccan chef to conclude that the difference between seafood and chicken Bastilla is that one uses chicken and the other has seafood as the main ingredient. The seafood version combines shrimp, calamari, fish and a zesty rice vermicelli filling. As with chicken Bastilla, you can shape the Bastilla into a single large pie or divide it into individual-sized pies for convenience.

Mechoui. The Moroccan term mechoui means roasted over a fire and has become synonymous primarily with roasted lamb. Traditionally, celebrations with mechoui involved roasting an entire lamb on a spit. Modern celebrations often make use of an oven where just the leg or shoulder is roasted. The key to delicious mechoui is slow roasting. Whether you cook it over a fire or in the oven, the meat should be tender enough to pull off the bone.

 

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Couscous with Vegetables. You wouldn't expect a traditional Moroccan feast not to have couscous, would you? Festive recipes include steamed couscous piled high with stewed meat and vegetables. Those opting for vegetarian or vegan meals just omit the meat from the recipe. Cooks often top this dish with tfaya, a caramelized onion and raisin mixture.

 

Kabob

Lamb or Beef Kabobs. In the days following Eid Al-Adah, Moroccans feast on lamb or beef kabobs, using extra tender cuts of meat—fillet of steak or leg of lamb, for example. Onion, herbs, paprika, cumin, salt, and pepper make up traditional kabob seasonings. Traditionally, kabobs do not include skewered vegetables, but that doesn't mean it cannot be done. Give yourself plenty of time to marinate the meat in the spices before grilling.

 

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Traditional Moroccan Salad Plate. One of these traditional Moroccan salads by itself would be reason enough to celebrate. On special occasions, however, it's common to find five types of salad on one plate. The Moroccan salad plate includes Moroccan rice and tuna salad, Moroccan green bean salad, Moroccan potato salad, Moroccan carrot salad, and Moroccan beet salad.

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